FRONT COVER

Living Well with Dementia: The Importance of the Person and the Environment for Wellbeing

The publication date is 17 January 2014, i.e. next week.

Thank to Charmaine Hardy (@charbhardy), a very important #dementiachallenger, for kind permission for me to use the picture of her poppy on the front cover of my book.

From the book:

“There are approximately 800,000 people with dementia in the United Kingdom, costing the economy £23bn a year. By 2040, the number of people affected is expected to double – and the costs are likely to treble.

This unique guide provides a much needed overview of dementia care. With a strong focus on the importance of patients and families, it explores the multifaceted meaning behind patient wellbeing and its vital significance in the context of national policy.

Adopting a positive, evidence-based approach, the book dispels the bleak outlook on dementia management. Its person-centred ideology considers fundamental areas such as independence, leisure and other activities, and end-of-life care – integrating the NICE quality standard where relevant. It also places great emphasis on patient environment including practical home and ward design, the importance of gardens, and sensory considerations.

All public and health care professionals will be stimulated by Rahman’s outstanding assimilation of theory and practice. Patients, their families and friends will also find much for inspiration and practical assistance.”

Benefits

  • CPD accredited: helping you to achieve your points effectively for revalidation
  • An evidence-based, thought-provoking overview of  the ever-enlarging field of ‘living well with dementia’
  • Highly practical and unique – assimilating theory and patient –centered practice. Covers topics such as communication and living well with dementia, home and ward design, assisted technology, and built environments successfully preparing readers for real-life caring
  • Fully referenced with case studies, tables and charts help to illustrate key points and ensure a strong foundation of knowledge is gained.

Summary of contents

Dedication • Acknowledgements • Foreword by Professor John Hodges • Foreword by Sally Ann Marciano • Foreword by Professor Facundo Manes • Introduction • What is ‘living well with dementia’? • Measuring living well with dementia • Socio-economic arguments for promoting living well with dementia • A public health perspective on living well in dementia, and the debate over screening • The relevance of the person for living well with dementia • Leisure activities and living well with dementia • Maintaining wellbeing in end-of-life care for living well with dementia • Living well with specific types of dementia: a cognitive neurology perspective • General activities which encourage wellbeing • Decision-making, capacity and advocacy in living well with dementia • Communication and living well with dementia • Home and ward design to promote living well with dementia • Assistive technology and living well with dementia • Innovations i living well with dementia • The importance of built environments for living well with dementia •  Dementia-friendly communities and living well with dementia • Conclusion

Reviews

‘Amazing … A truly unique and multi-faceted contribution. The whole book is infused with passion and the desire to make a difference to those living with dementia…A fantastic resource and user guide covering topics such as communication and living well with dementia, home and ward design, assisted technology, and built environments. Shibley should be congratulated for this unique synthesis of ideas and practice.’
Professor John R Hodges, in his Foreword

‘Outstanding…I am so excited about Shibley’s book. It is written in a language that is easy to read, and the book will appeal to a wide readership. He has tackled many of the big topics ‘head on’, and put the person living with dementia and their families at the centre of his writing. You can tell this book is written by someone who ‘understands’ dementia; someone who has seen its joy, but also felt the pain…Everyone should be allowed to live well with dementia for however long that may be, and, with this book, we can go some way to making this a reality for all.’
Sally-Ann Marciano, in her Foreword

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